• Psychedelics - assisted psychotherapy in

    Arkansas

    Despite the huge therapeutic potential, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy is not part of standard medical care yet. Self-medicating with psychedelics can produce undesired results, but despite that, more and more people feel disappointed with the efficacy of the current treatments and they turn to risky, but potentially more beneficial psychedelic-assisted therapy. The goal of this guide is harm reduction for people, who decided to self-medicate, we don’t encourage possession or consumption of illicit substances even for therapeutic endeavours.

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Psychedelics – assisted psychotherapy in Arkansas

Legal status of psychedelics in Arkansas

Illegal possession of controlled substances in Arkansas can result in a variety of punishments, including jail or prison time. Arkansas categorizes felonies into six felony classes (unclassified, Y, A, B, C, and D), with the most serious felonies being classified as class Y and the least serious felonies being classified as class D. Felony drug abuse offenses are categorized as A, B, C, or D, with sentences ranging from a year to 30 years in jail. Misdemeanors are divided into three categories (A, B, and C). Illegal possession of such controlled substances is a class A misdemeanor, the most severe category of a misdemeanor conviction, with a maximum penalty of one year in jail.

The punishment for possession of Schedules I or II controlled substance (not cocaine or methamphetamine) depends on the amount of the drug in the defendant’s possession. Possession of less than two grams is a class D felony. A Class D Felony carries a maximum sentence of six years.

The safest way to obtain psychedelics in Arkansas

Psilocybin spores are technically legal in Alaska, so one can discretely cultivate a small number of shrooms for personal use.

Psychedelics-assisted therapy is still illegal in Arkansas, but it’s possible to find psychologists who can help to integrate the experience. Arkansas has been reluctant to implement drug reform, but it has made strides. For example, the state has begun to implement a system that allows marijuana to be legalized in some medical situations. This gives psilocybin mushroom users reason to be hopeful, particularly given the drug’s health and psychological benefits. For the time being, however, possessing and distributing psilocybin mushrooms in Arkansas is obviously illegal and punishable by law.